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20121116
20121116
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
't, toure. some complementary things said from an aide close to speaker boehner saying it was a very productive, positive meeting there with the president at the white house. the most interesting thing, though, from the boehner aide was that john boehner believes there is not enough time from now until the end of the year to actually have a grand bargain. there's enough time, though, to put together the framework for what a grand bargain would look like. essentially have the top lines agreed to that by sometime in 2013 you could have both the chambers, the senate and the house, come together on some substantial tax reform, entitlement reform, and get rid of the sort of automatic cuts that we see as a sequester, and the tax increases and have a mechanism you can replace them with. listen to the congressional leaders in their photo op in the white house before thanksgiving that they had today. >> we've put revenue on the table, as long as it's accompanied by significant spending cuts. >> we have a cornerstones of being able to work something out. we're both going to have to give up som
was that john boehner was re-elected as speaker by this republican conference, and they knew that boehner was going to be a dealmaker with the president. so even the hard liners may have read the election returns, and i think even the hard liners don't be responsible for a tax increase. >> not only boehner, even mcconnell. let me show you this, michelle. mcconnell and boehner had a different kind of sound, different tone today after the meeting. watch this. >> obviously the president won re-election. the republicans were basically unable to get any seats in the senate. more people voted for democrats in the house than republicans. why do you have any leverage whatsoever? >> there's a republican majority here in the house. the american people re-elected the republican majority. >> it's important to remember that in this case, the voters also re-elected a republican-controlled house last week. the fact is the government is organized no differently today than it was after the republican wave of 2010. >> now, listen to what they had to say today. >> tomorrow is speaker boehner's birthday. so
-free from anywhere. >> caller: why is he talking to speaker boehner. wasn't he tried to get everybody paid off. >> stephanie: from the tobacco companies. >> caller: from the cigarette companies, i mean for years. i've watched politics for years and i mean it was always like a joke two and three years ago always drunk all the time. >> well, yeah. >> caller: you know, a political joke. i've heard people say that. i just want to make a comment. i was watching david schuster the last show, and i can't--i just want to make a comment because i've watched him for years, too. my friend have sisters in college, and i guess he's really popular in dorms. >> stephanie: he's dreamy. >> caller: in dorm rooms. people have pictures of him in their dorm rooms. >> stephanie: really? i can't wait to tease him about that. >> caller: politics, i'm just a housewife, and i hear stories about college but we're not there. >> stephanie: he's like a political geek liker beat. >> like shawn cassidy of the political world. >> caller: they were talking about religion on the last show, and i just wanted to make a comme
of those things need to be in play. when john boehner talks about raising revenue he's willing to do that if it only comes in the form of tax reform, not raising tax rates, but actually lore erring tax rates, closing loopholes, broadening the base and you will get more money coming into the treasury. the other part of the equation that is so important which has not been part of the public conversation is cutting spending, not just slowing the rate of growth but actually cutting spending to try to get this deficit under control. i know the republicans don't control the narrative on this but i want to hear more from them on that side of the equation. jon: julie our nodding your head you must agree. >> i think both sides need to come to the table. enough already with these sort of, you know, showmanship, game man ship, these are people's lives that are at stake in this economy. monica is right in that the president does control the upper hand at this point. if nothing is done all the bush tax rates will expire. you have exit polling coming out of the recent election saying two-thirds of
, the maker of the new accu-chek nano blood glucose meter. >> eliot: house speaker john boehner may not want to raise marginal tax rates on the wealthiest americans but he would probably be surprised to hear the view of one subset of the so-called 1%. they gave us our number of the day. 220. that's how many folks make up the patriotic millionaires. 2-year-old group that's asking for higher tax rates on the rich. on themselves. these are certifiably rich people including game publisher carlston and the founder of the men's wearhouse george zipper. about a dozen of them visited washington, d.c. yesterday to advocate reasonable policies such as a clinton era top tax rate of 39.6%. considering the escalation we've seen on the incomes of the top 1%, they want a new tax bracket for anyone making more than $10 million a year. yes, these patriotic millionaires would like their own tax rates to go up. you have to be nuts to actually want to pay more in taxes? no. not nuts. in fact, you don't even have to do it as a matter of fai
connell, who's the senate minority leader, he's taking a tougher stand than even boehner. let's listen to both of those positions. >> let's be clear. an opening bid of $1.6 trillion in new taxes just isn't serious. it's more than simpson/bowles or any other bipartisan commission has called for. it's been unanimously rejected in the house and senate. it's twice as much as the white house agreed to last summer during the debt ceiling talks, and looked at in the context of the spending cuts yet to be implemented, it amounts to about 20 cents in cuts for every new dollar in tax hikes. in other words, no cuts at all. it's a joke. a joke. >> we right away say 98% of americans are not going to see their taxes go up. 97% of small businesses are not going to see their taxes go up. if we get that in place, we are actually removing half of the fiscal cliff. half of the danger to our economy is removed by that single step. >> okay. so is it a joke, or as the democrats would say, the math isn't adding up? let's look at the issue of deficit reduction. the democrats say the -- let's say if you cut loopholes
standing next to john boehner? >> and mitch mcconnell -- >> and mitch mcconnell by the way. right. >> the president is in a different position now. re-elected by a pretty impressive margin than he was the last time he tried to forge a deal that collapsed. >> right. that was the debt ceiling. he had a real problem with that with the grand bargain. he also had after the 2010 midterms when he had a lame duck session of congress and he had to give on keeping the tax cuts for the wealthy. this is a president right now who believes he's got some leverage. he got re-elected. and these are republicans who are trying to figure out just who they are andy ds sun the president's press conference earlier this week, he's somebody who studied the flaws of a e d i make some progress without overreaching. it's very clear they're worried at the white house about doing some overreach here. if he can get a fiscal deal done, that will be very, very important for his legacy in the long-term. and he knows it. >> are the republicans operating from the same game plan? >> no. i think they're not. i mean,
president obama and the four top congressional leaders john boehner, nancy pelosi, harry reid, mitch mcconnell all will begin talks at the white house. cnn's jill dougherty is following those developments for us this morning. she's in our washington, d.c. bureau. good morning, jill. >> hello, soledad. well, this is it. both sides are going to be there. they're looking at the tone. they're looking at the president, what kind of tone will he set? you have to say that they're coming in both sides with their essential positions intact. all, both sides are saying that there is some room for a compromise. so, the essential thing is how do you compromise? if you look at the positions, let's say, of the republicans, and it's most strongly, as i say, relayed by senator mitch mcconnell, he does not, and they do not, want any tax increases. so let's listen to him first. >> and let's be clear, an opening bid of $1.6 trillion of new taxes just isn't serious. it's more than simpson-bowles or any other bipartisan commission has called for. it's been unanimously rejected in the house and senate, it's t
and the ongoing relationship with boehner and mcconnell because he's going to have to be a different kind of leader with them. he talked about it in the press conference a bit the other day. he needs to reach out to them the way he's reached out to people on staten island and dealt with the two governors, christie and cuomo, who are two pretty demanding guys as well. and based on their public and private comments have been very happy with the president's leadership and his government. >> i just wonder if it's fair to make a parallel when you look at the president's response to sandy which has had and continues to have just devastating effects on the economy for businesses and the reaction to the bp oil spill which seemed slow in coming because that was devastating as well to a different part of the country. >> he certainly was. he was very slow to respond to people in the gulf coast. >> in terms of appearances. >> i think things have changed, though, over the past couple years. and i suspect that, you know, even the president's closest allies will say that it was a very hard adjustment go
connell and john boehner's people sort of drawing their lines in the sand. that's not really happening even though that is sort of by far much sort of bigger story as far as what's going to happen in the country. as far as -- and priority list for both the white house and congress. >> do you think they also get that at the white house? that as long as -- as much as they may be getting hurt or not by the islamist people are talking about benghazi, it enables some room for the white house to get involved in the negotiations as well. >> it allows them to negotiate this without sort of a spotlight on fiscal cliff story which is -- you know, a story that has about six weeks left in it before some -- before taxes go up on everyone and significant spending cuts happen across the country. not just the military. >> you've been covering the hill for awhile in addition to the campaigns. do you get the sense that this will be the time when they say okay, they've reached some agreement on the tax out on the revenue side and republicans eat i
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)